News

Ten Questions for Our Seasonal Loon Biologists 

What’s it like to work with loons in the field? For the spring and summer of 2022, two seasonal biologists, Earl Johnson and Jill Marianacci, have been working with Maine Audubon on the Loon Restoration Project, doing everything from building artificial nests for loons that struggle to hatch chicks, …

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Commonly Misidentified Species: Plovers

COMMONLY MISIDENTIFIED SPECIES: It’s not always easy to identify Maine’s most beloved birds. Maine Audubon biologists and naturalists commonly field identification questions along the lines of “is it this, or is it that?”. Many species look similar from a distance, but there are some great telltale …

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Help Monarchs, Plant Milkweed!

Monarchs are on decline across much of North America. This is due to a myriad of factors including habitat loss; use of synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicide; and climate change. One of the best things YOU can do is plant milkweed host plants and nectar-rich native perennials. Maine …

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RARE BIRD ALERT: EURASIAN MARSH-HARRIER

UPDATE: 28 Aug 2022 – Unfortunately there were no sightings of the Eurasian Marsh-Harrier today, despite many observers looking in the area. Late August is the time when marsh-harriers are beginning their fall migration, so this bird may be on its way south, so birders in areas like the Scarborough …

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Four Lessons I Learned from Working with Piping Plovers this Summer

Hello! I’m Emma Sloan, a biologist with Maine Audubon’s Plover Crew. We have spent this summer protecting the endangered Piping Plover along 22 beaches in southern Maine. As a new graduate and new resident of Maine, I have learned so much through this work. So, before the season ends, I wanted to …

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Backyard bird of the month for August: Tree Swallow

A welcome and familiar sight near summer fields and wetlands across North America, Tree Swallows are clever aerialists with deep blue iridescent backs and stark white undersides. These birds are often found zipping through the sky in a series of acrobatic twists and turns while catching and feeding …

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