News & Notes


The Christmas Bird Count: Hurray for Citizen Science!

Posted on: Wednesday, December 17th, 2014

lopez-birders

One of the best things about my new job at Maine Audubon is that it has once again brought me close to people who are citizen-scientists.  I first witnessed the power of citizen science 25 years ago, when I became CEO of Trout Unlimited. At that time, hundreds of volunteers were gathering data on stream acidification in the southeastern United States, and their work was helping federal and state agencies do a better job of limiting emissions of the air pollutants that caused acid rain. In the decades that followed, I saw a number of other examples of citizens contributing the information needed for well-informed conservation decision-making.

I’m glad to be back in the company of citizens who practice science in the service of conservation.  From December 14 to January 5, Maine Audubon volunteers will join citizen-scientists nationwide for the 115th Annual Christmas Bird Count. Maine Audubon’s members (over 2,000 contribute to citizen science each year!) are the backbone of a vital effort to track the status and trends of birds in the huge swath of habitat that is Maine. Without their work, we’d be far less informed about the effects of climate change on the 50 Maine bird species that the recent National Audubon report on North American birds and climate change tells us are at risk. Maine Audubon could not possibly hire enough professionals to fill this important data gap.

The Christmas Bird Count is citizen science at its best. Not only are its practitioners gathering information that is critical to conservation; they are also demonstrating the passion for wildlife that is the essential ingredient—the special sauce—that translates science into policy. So go forth, and let the counting begin!

- Charles

P.S. In case you haven’t heard, the Maine section of the International Appalachian Trail was named after Dick Anderson, former executive director of Maine Audubon. Watch the segment on Bill Green’s Maine to learn more about this great conservation leader in Maine.

Charles Gauvin, Executive Director

Charles Gauvin, Executive Director

Charles Gauvin started at Maine Audubon in 2014. Gauvin brings more than 25 years of experience in conservation leadership, much of it as the president and CEO of Trout Unlimited, the nation’s leading river and fish conservation organization.Gauvin most recently served as Chief Development Officer at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, DC. He collaborated with Carnegie scholars worldwide to develop program strategies and support in the United States, Europe, Russia, the Middle East, Asia and South Asia.

Gifts for the Naturalist on your Holiday Shopping List!

Posted on: Tuesday, December 16th, 2014

It’s December and that means one thing: the annual Christmas Bird Count! Well, maybe to birders that’s what it means, but for everyone else, it is a time for celebrating the holidays. Here are some gift ideas for the budding naturalist and nature lover in your life:

 1) SibleySibley Birds, Second Edition

The Sibley Guide to Birds has long been my favorite field guide. David Allen Sibley’s paintings are amazingly lifelike and represent almost all identifiable forms (male, female, juvenile, subspecies, in flight, etc) for each species. The second edition that came out earlier this year builds on that masterpiece.

 

2) HarperCharley Harper Calendars

Harper’s artwork approaches the natural world with a minimalistic and whimsical view. You don’t even need to be a naturalist to appreciate his art and what better a gift than a calendar to allow someone to appreciate his art all year long!

 

 

3) Feeders (1)Bird Feeders

Give the gift of birds! You can help connect someone with birds by bringing them (and other wildlife) to their front yard. There are lots of different feeders on the market with different purposes so think about who you are giving one to and where they live. Personally, I’d recommend the Squirrel Buster Plus – we just added one to our set up at Gilsland Farm and haven’t had a squirrel on it yet!

4) Singing BirdsAudubon Singing Birds

These singing toys are great for all ages and so many species are available. Who wouldn’t want an adorable Piping Plover chick for the holidays?

 

 

 

5) Look UpLook Up! Birdwatching in Your Own Backyard

This Robert F. Sibert Informational Honor winner is a great book to introduce young people to birding. Recommended for ages 8-12, this book provides an ‘in’ for kids to get hooked on nature at an age where it is easy to be distracted from it. It reads like a ‘how to’ but takes a very funny and entertaining approach to getting started.

 

 

Come visit us to see these products and more at our Nature Stores in Falmouth and Holden.

-Doug

Doug Hitchcox Head Shot - please credit  M. Kathleen Kelly (1)Meet Doug Hitchcox, Maine Audubon Staff Naturalist

A Maine native, Doug grew up in Hollis and graduated from the University of Maine in 2011. Throughout college Doug worked at Scarborough Marsh Audubon Center and was hired as Maine Audubon’s staff naturalist in the summer of 2013, a long time “dream job.” In his free time, Doug volunteers as one of Maine’s eBird reviewers, is the owner and moderator of the ‘Maine-birds’ listserv and serves as York County Audubon board member and Secretary of the Maine Bird Records Committee.

 

Submit your question for Doug:

MEDIA RELEASE: Maine Audubon Expresses Concern over Second Lynx Killing

Posted on: Wednesday, December 10th, 2014

MEDIA RELEASE

For Immediate Release

December 10, 2014

Contact: Michelle Smith, Communications & Marketing Manager
msmith@maineaudubon.org
(207) 781-2330 x209
Mobile: (207) 838-0511

Maine Audubon Expresses Concern over Second Lynx Killing
The wildlife conservation group praises Maine DIFW for taking steps to prevent additional deaths 

Lynx

The Canada lynx is a federally threatened species.

Falmouth – Maine Audubon, the state’s largest wildlife conservation organization, has expressed concern over the second killing this year of the federally threatened Canada lynx. The United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) recently approved an incidental take permit (ITP) for Canada lynx, which allows up to three lynx to be killed in traps over the 15-year course of the permit.

“The fact that two lynx have already been killed this year is very troubling,” noted Jenn Burns Gray, Maine Audubon’s staff attorney and advocate. “Given the lack of population data on Canada lynx in Maine and the impacts of climate change, we are disappointed that USFWS issued the ITP in the first place. The two fatalities demonstrate that the ITP wasn’t strong enough. USFWS should have taken a more precautionary approach, one that allows trapping to continue with more rigorous standards ensuring minimal impact on lynx.”

This second killing has led the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (DIFW) to implement an emergency trapping rule, which bans the use of most lethal traps and above-ground foot hold traps throughout northern Maine. “We are very pleased that DIFW has taken swift action to ban lethal and foot hold traps that are known to incidentally capture and harm lynx,” noted Charles Gauvin, Executive Director at Maine Audubon. “The Department is working quickly to help prevent further deaths of this threatened species.”

The two recent lynx killings underscore the need to strengthen the ITP’s protections. One of the major issues with the ITP is that it relies on self-reporting of captured lynx from trappers. DIFW should help trappers by playing a more active role in monitoring traps. One approach would be to require third-party checks on all trap lines where lynx could be caught.

Canada Lynx are protected in Maine under the federal Endangered Species Act because of their small population size. Lynx are top predators that require large patches of unfragmented boreal forest to feed, rest and raise their young. They thrive in cold, snowy conditions, where their large paws and thick fur help them endure the long winter months chasing their favorite prey, the snowshoe hare.

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About Maine Audubon
Maine Audubon’s science-based approach to conservation, education and advocacy advances wildlife and wildlife habitat conservation in Maine. Our citizen science programs connect Maine people to engaging volunteer opportunities that make meaningful contributions to conservation research. The largest Maine-based wildlife conservation organization, Maine Audubon has eight centers and wildlife sanctuaries and serves over 50,000 people annually, with 15,000 members and 2,000 volunteers.

Conserving Maine’s wildlife. For everyone.

Please visit www.maineaudubon.org for more information.
Facebook: & Twitter ID: Maine Audubon

 

 

 

 

 

MEDIA RELEASE: Maine Audubon to Participate in 115th Annual Christmas Bird Count

Posted on: Tuesday, December 9th, 2014

Christmas Bird CountMEDIA RELEASE 

For Immediate Release

December 9, 2014

Contact: Michelle Smith, Communications & Marketing Manager
msmith@maineaudubon.org
(207) 781-2330 x209
Mobile: (207) 838-0511

 Maine Audubon to Participate in 115th Annual Christmas Bird Count
Annual bird survey helps to shape national conservation policy

Falmouth – Maine Audubon invites experienced volunteers across the state to participate in the longest-running citizen science survey in the world, the annual Audubon Christmas Bird Count (CBC). Between December 14, 2014 and January 5, 2015, hundreds of participants in Maine (and thousands across the Western Hemisphere) will brave inclement weather to help scientists assess and guide significant conservation efforts at a scale they could not accomplish alone. Maine Audubon will hold the CBC in the greater Portland area on Sunday, December 14; in the Orono-Old Town area on Saturday, December 20; and in the Bangor-Bucksport area on January 3, 2015.

Audubon’s annual Christmas Bird Count produces the most comprehensive data set depicting the fluctuation, range and movement of bird populations across the continent. Scientists rely on this trend data to better understand how birds and the environment are faring and what needs to be done to protect them. The Maine bird count contributes to this vast volunteer network and continues a holiday tradition that stretches back over 100 years.

“The Audubon Christmas Bird Count harnesses volunteer power to gather knowledge that shapes conservation policy across the country,” noted Maine Audubon’s Doug Hitchcox, staff naturalist and coordinator of the Maine Christmas Bird Count. “Christmas Bird Count data is becoming increasingly important not only in documenting current climate change but in predicting the future effects of climate change on Maine and North American bird populations. If we know what to expect, we can start taking action now to do something about it.”

Volunteer contributions to the CBC is what enabled National Audubon scientists to predict how climate change will alter the geographical ranges of North American bird species in a recent groundbreaking study. Released this past fall, the study found that 314 North American bird species (including 50 in Maine) are at risk because of climate change, which means they could potentially lose more than 50% of their range by 2080.

Because of the CBC, we also know that Maine is seeing more bird species in the winter that were traditionally found further south. Going back nearly forty years, it was exceptional to see a Carolina Wren or Red-bellied Woodpecker in Maine – now we see them regularly as far north as Rockland. Eastern Bluebirds have long been a breeding bird in Maine, but it was only in 1992 that they were first observed here during a Christmas Count. Since then, they have been seen almost annually with each year usually exceeding the prior. One Eastern Bluebird was spotted in 1992; last year, there were 336 bluebirds reported during the Christmas Count in Maine.

“Even if you can’t participate in this year’s count, you can help by filling your backyard feeders,” said Hitchcox. “This will help counters observe more species.” For more information, or to participate in year’s Christmas Bird Count, please contact Doug Hitchcox at dhitchcox@maineaudubon.org or call (207) 781-2330 x237.

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About Maine Audubon
Maine Audubon’s science-based approach to conservation, education and advocacy advances wildlife and wildlife habitat conservation in Maine. Our citizen science programs connect Maine people to engaging volunteer opportunities that make meaningful contributions to conservation research. The largest Maine-based wildlife conservation organization, Maine Audubon has eight centers and wildlife sanctuaries and serves over 50,000 people annually, with 15,000 members and 2,000 volunteers.

Conserving Maine’s wildlife. For everyone.

Please visit www.maineaudubon.org for more information.
Facebook: & Twitter ID: Maine Audubon

 

 

 

 

 

Our Naturalist Answers Your Questions

Posted on: Wednesday, December 3rd, 2014

One of the goals of this blog is to answer your questions. Below are a few that I received over the past month. I hope these are informative for everyone and spark new inquiries!

The Naturalist Answers Your Questions:

downloadQuestion: Kathryn sent in a question I often receive  “I have robins and juncos eating something from my dirt driveway (had to be plowed because of the snowstorm) – what are they eating?

Answer: They are most likely eating the dirt itself! Many bird species will actually eat dirt (and grit) and store it in their gizzard (an organ in their digestive tract) to help them grind up food.

 

 

imagesQuestion: Following our Turkey Fun Facts post, Tom wondered: “What do turkeys feed on during the winter? Do they feed on the same things as a partridge?”

Answer: A turkey’s diet in winter is almost entirely made up of mast (acorns and nuts) that they uncover by scratching at the forest floor. They probably supplement with fruit/berries they can find, but this is not a necessity.

 

download (1)Question: Sandra asked this great question as a follow up to our November Sparrows post:  Hi Doug! Thank you for the description with the distinctive markings of each Sparrow. The sparrow is actually an important bird to me so I would love to attract them – what is the best kind of bird feed to use in my feeder?

Answer: Spreading seed on the ground is a great way to attract sparrows – they are more at home scratching around on the ground than perching on feeders. I would recommend a mixed seed, but sparrows seem to favor safflower and especially white millet.

 

Question: With rare birds around like the Crested Caracara, Robert asked: “How does a person subscribe to the various Maine rare bird alerts?

Photo; Doug Hitchcox, ME Audubon

Photo: Doug Hitchcox, Maine Audubon

Answer: There are a few options for Rare Bird Alerts in Maine:

1) Maine-birds Listserv (Google Group)  This list is not limited to rare bird sightings, but this is often where they are first reported and where you will find the most information.

2) There are several “digests” that offer alternate views of Maine birds:

Sala.com: The Birding Lists Digest

American Birding Assocation: Maine Bird News by Date

3) eBird Alerts Many Maine birders are now using eBird so anything rare (rare for Maine or rare for the season) that is reported to eBird will show up here. This is a great resource, as it also has direct links to maps.

-Doug

Doug Hitchcox Head Shot - please credit  M. Kathleen Kelly (1)Meet Doug Hitchcox, Maine Audubon Staff Naturalist

A Maine native, Doug grew up in Hollis and graduated from the University of Maine in 2011. Throughout college Doug worked at Scarborough Marsh Audubon Center and was hired as Maine Audubon’s staff naturalist in the summer of 2013, a long time “dream job.” In his free time, Doug volunteers as one of Maine’s eBird reviewers, is the owner and moderator of the ‘Maine-birds’ listserv and serves as York County Audubon board member and Secretary of the Maine Bird Records Committee.

 

Submit your question for Doug:

A Day of Giving for Wildlife

Posted on: Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

Giving Tuesday
Today is Giving Tuesday, a national day dedicated to giving back to your local community. Playing on the consumer-driven “Black Friday” and “Cyber-Monday” marketing tactics, nonprofit organizations seized the concept to remind people that the holiday season is not just a time to buy gifts, but a time to give to local organizations working on issues they care about.

Here at Maine Audubon, 95% of the donations we receive come from individuals. We rely on the generosity of our members, supporters, summer visitors and others who care about helping Maine wildlife surmount the many obstacles they face: development, sprawl, pollution and most importantly, climate change.

And though Maine Audubon’s mission is wildlife conservation, the magic of Maine Audubon is found in its people – people who make financial donations and people who volunteer their time. It’s when people unite, donate and commit to wildlife conservation that change starts to happen.

Maine Audubon is fortunate to have a mission and programs that engage a broad array of people at all stages of their lives. Whether you’re young or old or somewhere in-between, and whether you’re a bird watcher, an angler, a hunter, or just someone who respects nature for what it is, there’s something here for you. If you don’t know us, I encourage you to visit us at Gilsland Farm or one of our other locations, explore our website and sign up for email updates. I think you’ll like what you see. And please remember – Maine Audubon cannot accomplish its mission without your generosity

Thank you considering a donation today on this special day of giving.

- Charles

Charles Gauvin, Executive Director

Charles Gauvin, Executive Director

Charles Gauvin started at Maine Audubon in 2014. Gauvin brings more than 25 years of experience in conservation leadership, much of it as the president and CEO of Trout Unlimited, the nation’s leading river and fish conservation organization.Gauvin most recently served as Chief Development Officer at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, DC. He collaborated with Carnegie scholars worldwide to develop program strategies and support in the United States, Europe, Russia, the Middle East, Asia and South Asia.

Is that a moth? In November?!

Posted on: Thursday, November 20th, 2014

November always seems like a strange time to see insects. It seems even more bizarre when we experience nights that are at or near freezing temperatures and moths are still active. There are only a few moths that can do this, some “good” and some “bad,” but it is an interesting adaptation. Their purpose for hanging around for so long is that most of their predators have already left our area: bats have gone into their winter hibernacula and many songbirds have migrated south. So who are these late moths? Let’s take a look at two that you may have noticed recently:

moth

Bruce Spanworm (Operophtera bruceata)

Our native late flying moth is often considered a pest. It is known for being a native defoliator, often causing damage to our deciduous trees. This usually happens early enough in the spring that trees can refoliate, but when it happens during a drought year, it can severely impact sap production. Luckily, as a native part of our ecosystem, their populations are kept minimal, thanks to natural controls like parasites, predators and disease.

Winter Moth (Operophtera brumata)

There is the non-native moth you could see flying around. Winter Moths, native to Europe, were originally introduced to North America via Nova Scotia sometime before 1950. This species unfortunately does not have any native parasites or predators here and can therefore cause a lot of damage. 

A big problem is that Winter Moths look almost identical to the native Bruce Spanworm. They cannot be identified in the field and can only be separated by examining the male genitalia (not easily done) or, as the biologists studying them like to phrase it: “sequencing the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene.” Winter Moth has been documented along coastal Maine, from Kittery to Bar Harbor:

graph

(Elkintin, 2010, p. 139)

The reason I point this out is that even if you are seeing a moth flying around in November, you do not necessarily have to worry about a Winter Moth outbreak. Many people respond to outbreaks with pesticide use or tree removal, which might not always be necessary and could have adverse impacts on native wildlife.

If you’d like to learn more about these moths, a full life history for Bruce Spanworm, including how it got that funny name, is available here.

Also, the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry has this article on Winter Moths, which includes information on controlling their populations and a parasitic fly that could be a safe answer.

Literature cited: Elkinton, J., Boettner, G., Sremac, M., Gwiazdowski, R., Hunkins, R., Callahan, J., … Campbell, N. (2010). Survey for Winter Moth (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) in Northeastern North America with Pheromone-Baited Traps and Hybridization with the Native Bruce Spanworm (Lepidoptera: Geometridae). Annals of the Entomological Society of America,103(2), 135-145.

-Doug

Doug Hitchcox Head Shot - please credit  M. Kathleen Kelly (1)Meet Doug Hitchcox, Maine Audubon Staff Naturalist

A Maine native, Doug grew up in Hollis and graduated from the University of Maine in 2011. Throughout college Doug worked at Scarborough Marsh Audubon Center and was hired as Maine Audubon’s staff naturalist in the summer of 2013, a long time “dream job.” In his free time, Doug volunteers as one of Maine’s eBird reviewers, is the owner and moderator of the ‘Maine-birds’ listserv and serves as York County Audubon board member and Secretary of the Maine Bird Records Committee.

 

Submit your question for Doug:

Double-or-Nothing on Climate Change

Posted on: Monday, November 17th, 2014

Whatever Maine residents felt about the recent election results, there was little to cheer about where action on climate change is concerned. Maine people are deeply concerned about and already experiencing climate change’s ecological and economic impacts (consider the Gulf of Maine’s threatened shrimp fishery, the insect invasions that are ruining our forests and the ticks that are taking down our moose). Yet, as of Election Day, a global climate policy solution was nowhere in sight.

obama china usa today

Chinese President, Xi Jinping and President Obama.

But last Wednesday we were given something to cheer about. The nation woke up to a surprise announcement that President Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping had reached an agreement obligating their respective nations to reduce carbon emissions. The agreement—involving the world’s two biggest sources of greenhouse gas emissions— has the potential to catalyze global efforts to combat climate change. It also could help protect Maine wildlife (and people) from the worst impacts of climate change. But the agreement will do neither of these things if Congress scuttles the Obama administration’s plan to curb greenhouse gas emissions.

Greenhouse Gas Emissions

co2emssionsbycountry

Click on chart to enlarge.

The United States and China have argued for years over which nation should take initiative on curbing greenhouse gas emissions. What had been a largely unproductive discussion changed course last spring, after President Obama proposed carbon emissions standards for power plants and gave states broad flexibility in meeting them. The Obama plan—to reduce carbon emissions by 30% from 2005 levels (already about 10% higher than they are today)—has been met with strong opposition along partisan lines.

Now some of the same objectors are claiming that the international agreement (which does not require congressional approval) doesn’t require enough sacrifice on China’s part. This is a curious position, given that the US and other highly developed nations grew their economies by filling the atmosphere with carbon much of the twentieth century, while the Chinese economy remained largely undeveloped.

The president’s agreement with China has significantly upped the ante. By leveraging his emissions plan to secure a commitment from China to reduce their own carbon emissions, he has ramped up the plan’s environmental benefits and opened the way for even further-reaching international action on climate change. But by tying his climate change plan to the agreement with China, he has also increased the possibility that partisan elements in Congress will succeed in undercutting or eliminating Obama’s emissions plan. It’s now double-or-nothing.

In a high stakes situation like this, every vote will count, especially in the US Senate. Maine Senator Angus King has already voiced strong support for the Obama Clean Power Plan. Senator Susan Collins, who has been a leader on climate issues, has taken a wait-and-see position on the Clean Power rules, pending the end of the public comment period. That occurred a month ago, and now it’s time for Senator Collins to lead on climate change once again by building bipartisan support for the rule and the international agreement that will greatly magnify its benefits.

- Charles

Charles Gauvin, Executive Director

Charles Gauvin, Executive Director

Charles Gauvin started at Maine Audubon in 2014. Gauvin brings more than 25 years of experience in conservation leadership, much of it as the president and CEO of Trout Unlimited, the nation’s leading river and fish conservation organization.Gauvin most recently served as Chief Development Officer at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, DC. He collaborated with Carnegie scholars worldwide to develop program strategies and support in the United States, Europe, Russia, the Middle East, Asia and South Asia.

Keep an eye out for these birds at your feeders!

Posted on: Thursday, November 13th, 2014

Have you noticed any change in the birds at your feeders? Many of our summer residents have migrated south, while winter visitors are now arriving and will fill the now available niches. My favorite example of this can be seen with two sparrows: Chipping Sparrow and American Tree Sparrow.

Here is a chart, generated using the Explore features in eBird, showing Chipping and American Tree Sparrow frequency throughout the year. Using citizen science data, we can see that Chipping Sparrows are present in the summer (April through November) and are essentially replaced by American Tree Sparrows in the winter (October through May).

sparrow1

Please click to enlarge graph

Most sparrow species are hard to identify, especially for beginners, but this is a good pair to begin with because they are common at your feeders and not likely to be confused with each other when you factor in the date. Here are a few important field marks to look for:

Chipping Sparrow

Chipping Sparrow

Chipping Sparrow is the perfect example of a spizella sparrow. Don’t roll your eyes at latin names, they are a very helpful tool in learning families (actually genera, in this case) of birds. Spizella sparrows all tend to be long and thin, making them smaller than the other sparrows we see. They also all have clear, unstreaked breasts. Other features are more variable: Chipping tend to show very rich red caps, especially in summer, but other species (Swamp Sparrow) can show this as well. 

 

American Tree Sparrow

American Tree Sparrow

American Tree Sparrows are superficially similar to Chipping Sparrows, and are currently considered spizella sparrows (though this is probably changing soon following recent genetic work), but have some key differences: they are slightly heftier – hopefully, since they are arctic breeders (a loose example of Bergmann’s Rule). They also look much grayer in the face. But my favorite field mark is their bicolored bill. Their mandible is yellow, and maxilla is very dark, almost black. American Tree Sparrows do show dark spots on their chest, while Chipping tend to be clear, but ALL SPARROWS CAN SHOW A DARK SPOT ON THEIR CHEST. A very important thing to remember with sparrows.

Keep an eye out for these birds at your feeders!

-Doug

Doug Hitchcox Head Shot - please credit  M. Kathleen Kelly (1)Meet Doug Hitchcox, Maine Audubon Staff Naturalist

A Maine native, Doug grew up in Hollis and graduated from the University of Maine in 2011. Throughout college Doug worked at Scarborough Marsh Audubon Center and was hired as Maine Audubon’s staff naturalist in the summer of 2013, a long time “dream job.” In his free time, Doug volunteers as one of Maine’s eBird reviewers, is the owner and moderator of the ‘Maine-birds’ listserv and serves as York County Audubon board member and Secretary of the Maine Bird Records Committee.

 

Submit your question for Doug:

Outreach Intern – Fields Pond Audubon Center

Posted on: Thursday, November 13th, 2014

The Outreach Intern will develop and deliver adult, family, and youth programs with a major emphasis on school children K-12. These programs are designed to instill fascination, understanding and responsibility for the natural world and focus on the natural history, sustainability, and human impacts. The outreach component allows Fields Pond Audubon Center to extend their programming goals and visibility to the greater Bangor area.

Qualifications and Essential Duties:

▪     Must have an ability to communicate effectively with various age groups and audiences on and off site;

▪     Know Maine’s natural history and ecological concepts;

▪     Able to assist children in understanding their role in the environment and how their behaviors affect nature;

▪     Have or be working towards a college degree in biology, education, or environmental studies;

▪     Able to communicate and deliver programs to a variety of audiences and learning styles from children through adults;

▪     Able to work with minimal supervision;

▪     Have current First Aid and CPR certification;

▪     Know how to use Microsoft Office including PowerPoint;

▪     Enthusiastic and flexible with a sense of humor; and

▪     Must pass a criminal background check.

Physical Requirements:

▪     Able to often lift objects up to 50 pounds when setting up program space;

▪     Able to frequently hike all trails on Fields Pond property as part of program;

▪     Able to use hands/fingers to operate computer and other program equipment;

▪     Able to work outdoors in challenging environmental conditions

Time frame: The position is part-time through the fall and spring semesters and will continue full-time in the summer.  Interns may apply for the year or a semester.

Internship Stipend: $1500 fall semester;  $1500 spring semester;  $5000  ten weeks late spring/summer

To apply: Please send a letter of intent and resume to Maine Audubon, 20 Gilsland Farm Rd, Falmouth, Maine 04105 or e-mail bpauls@maineaudubon.org.   We will begin reviewing applications immediately.  Resumes are accepted on an ongoing basis.

Maine Audubon is an Equal Opportunity Employer.   Any job offers are contingent on a successful criminal background check.