News & Notes


Part-time Properties Assistant

Posted on: Friday, June 24th, 2016

Location: Gilsland Farm, Falmouth, ME
Department: Properties
Immediate Supervisor: Properties Manager

Description

Maine Audubon is a widely respected conservation organization with headquarters located in Falmouth, Maine, with state-wide influence.  Our mission is to conserve Maine’s wildlife and habitat through conservation, education, and citizen action.  We are seeking a Part-time Properties Assistant at Gilsland Farm in Falmouth, Maine.  This is a hands-on skilled position that assists with a variety of property maintenance needs.

The Part-time Properties Assistant is responsible to assist the Properties Manager with day to day maintenance of Maine Audubon’s Gilsland Farm property, buildings and associated structures and facilities in a manner consistent with Maine Audubon’s mission, in order to provide a welcoming, friendly, safe and clean environment for visitors and employees.  Occasional property maintenance work also takes place off site at other Maine Audubon wildlife sanctuary properties.

Essential and Specific Functions

  • Responsible for lawn mowing and weed whacking
  • Assist with daily building cleaning, maintenance, and trash and recycling disposal.
  • Assist with landscape and flower bed maintenance
  • Be able to work with a range of volunteers on an as needed basis
  • Assist with general building maintenance projects including minor repairs, painting, and seasonal tasks
  • Perform routine maintenance on various mowers, power tools, and other landscape equipment
  • Assist with winter snow clearing operations, including snowblower operation, hand shoveling, and tractor operation

Qualifications

  • Knowledge and experience in use of hand tools, lawn mowers, power hand tools, and basic knowledge of maintenance of these tools
  • Experience working with power equipment such as tractors, riding mowers, chain saws, and a variety of power tools
  • Experience in general building maintenance functions
  • Valid driver’s license with good driving record
  • Must be able to pass a background check

Physical Requirements

  • This position has substantial physical demands including the ability to safely handle heavy equipment and materials
  • Able to lift objects up to 50 lbs.
  • Able to frequently hike natural woodland trails, including all trails on Gilsland Farm
  • Able to work outside in all seasons and weather conditions
  • Able to climb stairs
  • Able to drive passenger vehicles and pickup trucks

Timing and Benefits

  • 22.5 hours per week, M-F, year-round position
  • Part-time position – not eligible for benefits

To apply, please submit resume and cover letter to [email protected] with Part-time Properties Assistant in the subject title.  Position open until filled.  EOE.

MEDIA RELEASE: Maine Audubon Presents Doug Tallamy on the Importance of Native Plants

Posted on: Tuesday, June 21st, 2016

MEDIA RELEASE

For Immediate Release

June 21, 2016

Contact: LeslieTaylor
[email protected]
(207) 781-2330 x276
Cell: (347)225-1510

Maine Audubon Presents Doug Tallamy on the Importance of Native Plants
In Honor of Pollinator Week, Learn to Make Your Garden Wildlife-friendly

tallamytalkFALMOUTH – Learn how native plants attract pollinators and other wildlife at a talk by Dr. Doug Tallamy, chair of the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware, and author of Bringing Nature Home. Dr. Tallamy will speak at Gilsland Farm Audubon Center on Wednesday, June 29, from 7:00 to 9:00 pm as part of the Maine Audubon Speaker Series.  Online registration is encouraged.

Studies have shown that even a modest increase in the native plant cover on suburban properties greatly increases the diversity of insects, birds, and other animals that use the landscape. Native plants feed native bird species either directly with fruits and seeds, or indirectly by supporting native insects birds can eat.

As our population grows, wild landscapes are increasingly replaced with suburban backyards, grass lawns punctuated with non-native perennials and shrubs that support very few species of wildlife. In fact, the United States has planted over 62,500 square miles – some 40 million acres – of lawn!

In his talk, Dr. Tallamy will discuss the important benefits of choosing native plants for our gardens and emphasize the ecological, educational, physical, and emotional benefits of designing landscapes that can sustain plants and animals that were once common throughout the U.S.

This program and Maine Audubon’s Bringing Nature Home project are generously funded by a gift from Jim & Ann Hancock. Maine Audubon’s Speaker Series is sponsored by Maine Magazine, Allagash Brewing Company, and Chickadee Wines  

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About Maine Audubon

Maine Audubon’s science-based approach to conservation, education and advocacy advances wildlife and wildlife habitat conservation in Maine. Our citizen science programs connect Maine people to engaging volunteer opportunities that make meaningful contributions to conservation research. The largest Maine-based wildlife conservation organization, Maine Audubon has eight centers and wildlife sanctuaries and serves over 50,000 people annually, with 15,000 members and 2,000 volunteers.

Conserving Maine’s wildlife.

Please visit www.maineaudubon.org for more information. Facebook: & Twitter ID: Maine Audubon

MEDIA RELEASE: Volunteers Needed for Scarborough Marsh Audubon Center

Posted on: Monday, June 20th, 2016

MEDIA RELEASE

For Immediate Release

June 20, 2016

Contact: Linda Woodard
[email protected]
207-883-5100

Volunteers Needed for Scarborough Marsh Audubon Center
Maine Audubon seeks help on a variety of projects in support of Maine’s largest salt marsh  

SCARBOROUGH – Maine Audubon is looking for volunteers ages 14 and up to help with a variety of tasks at the Scarborough Marsh Nature Center. All experience levels are welcome and this is a perfect opportunity for students looking to beef up their college application, earn community service hours, or add experiences with nature and science to their resumes.

Depending on their interest and abilities, volunteers could help with:

  • Citizen Science Projects -  Participate in bird monitoring in July and August. This can be done by foot, canoe, or kayak. A Biodiversity Day in July will inventory all insects and plants in the marsh.  These monitoring projects provide a picture of the health of the marsh by documenting what species live there and noting any changes over time. All experience levels welcome.
  • The Nature Store – Greet visitors, organize store merchandise, answer phone calls, and assist with canoe rentals.
  • Canoe Rentals – Process paperwork, explain directions and safety, hand out lifejackets and paddles, move boats on and off storage rack, and assist visitors in and out of boats.
  • The Nature Center – Lead groups of all ages on explorations through the marsh. Lead walks, discuss animal mounts, maintain interactive exhibits, greet visitors and answer questions.
  • Buildings/Grounds Maintenance – Carry out carpentry and landscaping projects, maintain walking trails and boardwalks, paint, etc.

In addition, the Scarborough Marsh Audubon Center requires volunteers for special events, such as Snowy Egret Day and special projects, such as picking up returnables to raise money for the center.

If you are interested in helping out at the marsh, there is likely a project that fits your expertise!

No experience is necessary and the time commitment can be tailored to the volunteer’s schedule. Training will be provided.

To learn more about volunteering, contact: Linda Woodard 207-883-5100or smac@maineaudubon.org.

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About Maine Audubon

Maine Audubon’s science-based approach to conservation, education and advocacy advances wildlife and wildlife habitat conservation in Maine. Our citizen science programs connect Maine people to engaging volunteer opportunities that make meaningful contributions to conservation research. The largest Maine-based wildlife conservation organization, Maine Audubon has eight centers and wildlife sanctuaries and serves over 50,000 people annually, with 15,000 members and 2,000 volunteers.

Conserving Maine’s wildlife.

Please visit www.maineaudubon.org for more information. Facebook: & Twitter ID: Maine Audubon

MEDIA RELEASE: Penobscot River Restoration Project Celebrates Final Milestone, Reconnects River to the Sea

Posted on: Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

MEDIA RELEASE

For Immediate Release

June 14, 2016

Contact: Leslie Taylor, Media Manager
[email protected]
207-781-2330 x276
mobile: 347-225-1510

Penobscot River Restoration Project Celebrates Final Milestone,
Reconnects River to the Sea
Howland fish bypass completes collaborative effort to rebalance fisheries and hydropower on Maine’s largest river

Bypass panorama - credit Don Hudson

Photo by Don Hudson.

Howland, ME – Today, federal, state, local, and tribal representatives, and project partners gathered in Howland, Maine, to mark and celebrate the completion of the last major milestone in the Penobscot River Restoration Project: the newly constructed fish bypass around the dam in Howland.

Completion of this large stream-like channel will allow American shad, river herring, and Atlantic salmon to swim freely around the dam to and from important historic breeding, rearing, and nursery habitat for the first time in more than a century. The Howland fish bypass fulfills the Penobscot Project’s goal of significantly improving access to nearly 1,000 miles of Maine’s largest river for eleven species of native sea-run fish, while maintaining energy through increased hydropower generation at other dams in the watershed.

The Penobscot Project is widely considered one of the largest, most innovative river restoration projects in the nation.

The celebration event, held in Howland at the confluence of the Penobscot and Piscataquis Rivers, features diverse speakers, art work by local students, and a fish sculpture making Howland its first U.S. stop on a world tour of globally significant fish migration sites.

“The Howland Dam may seem far from the sea, but it has long kept migrating fish like Atlantic salmon and American shad from swimming between the ocean and their historic inland habitat,” says Laura Rose Day, Executive Director of the Penobscot River Restoration Trust. “This innovative ‘nature-like’ fish bypass reconnects the Piscataquis River to the main stem of the Penobscot and the Gulf of Maine, allowing sea-run fish to swim freely past the dam.

“The Penobscot Trust thanks the Town of Howland for working with us over many years to facilitate the success of the fish bypass. Adjacent to the town’s recently revitalized park, boat launch, and reclaimed former tannery site, the fish bypass should prove to be an asset for the future.”

Four years ago, in June 2012, the Great Works Dam removal began, followed by the removal of the Veazie Dam at the head of tide in 2013. At the same time, dam owners built a fish elevator at the Milford Dam, now the only dam on the lower Penobscot.  Dam owners increased power generation at several other locations within the Penobscot watershed to maintain and even increase power generation.

Today, the river is on the rebound. This year, more than 1.7 million river herring have already passed above dams removed by the Penobscot Project – up from only several thousand before the Veazie Dam was removed. Fish are now swimming upriver past Howland and into the Piscataquis and through the Mattaceunk Dam on the Penobscot in Medway, and have been observed more than 90 miles upriver from Penobscot Bay. In addition, a record-breaking 2,700 shad passed by Milford this spring. In another exciting development, last week fisheries experts saw the first American shad in recent history passing the West Enfield dam.

New community activities abound. The new national whitewater race, a 4-day event featuring activities from Old Town to Eddington, is entering its second year.  An annual alewife festival and children’s days has begun at Blackman Stream in Bradley, where more than 450,000 river herring swam up the stream this past month.

“Construction of the Howland bypass is another milestone in efforts to restore Maine’s native sea-run fisheries in the Penobscot River,” says Patrick Keliher, Commissioner of the Maine Department of Marine Resources. “Passage of anadromous fish species is critical to the health of our state’s marine and freshwater ecosystems. This project will not only provide access to hundreds of miles of critical habitat to Maine’s native sea-run fish, it will ensure continued opportunity for renewable power generation on the Penobscot River.”

“The Service is proud to have spent over a decade working with the partnership to creatively craft and create a better future for the Penobscot River, modeling how we should restore rivers across the globe,” says Dan Ashe, Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “We have completed monumental construction projects, energy improvements, and other steps redefining how the Penobscot River serves fish, the people of Maine, and the Penobscot Indian Nation. This project has managed to do it all: restore vital habitat for fish and wildlife, support energy needs, and create new economic and recreational opportunities throughout the watershed.”

Dam owners, conservation groups, tribal, state, and federal agencies, and citizens, worked together for more than a decade to accomplish the Penobscot River Restoration Project, which better balances restoration of native sea-run fish with hydropower generation.

“NOAA Fisheries congratulates the Penobscot River Restoration Trust on their completion of the nature-like bypass in Howland, and looks forward to the continued restoration of sea-run fish to the Penobscot River watershed,” says Dan Morris, Deputy Regional Administrator, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NOAA Fisheries Greater Atlantic Region.“The Trust, its member organizations, State of Maine, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, and Penobscot Indian Nation have been wonderful partners in the Penobscot River Restoration Project over the years.”

The restored river provides many cultural, economic, and recreational opportunities from the Penobscot headwaters to the Gulf of Maine. As a result of the project, the river now better supports Penobscot Indian Nation tribal culture, renews traditional uses, provides major benefits to fish and wildlife, and increases business and regulatory certainty for dam owners.

“The Penobscot River watershed is the ancestral home of the Penobscot Nation, and has sustained our tribal members since time immemorial,” says Kirk Francis, Chief of the Penobscot Nation. “The Penobscot River Restoration Project has allowed our tribe to continue our role as the original stewards of this great resource and we are proud to have been a part of a project that will benefit generations of all peoples well in to the future.”

The Penobscot Project also demonstrates how diverse interests can work together to develop results-based approaches to fisheries restoration and hydropower basin-wide. This type of approach could serve as a model for other efforts around the world.

Like the overall Penobscot Project, the Howland Bypass was funded through a combination of federal and private sources, with major funding from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Fish Passage Program.  The Howland Bypass design and construction team included Kleinschmidt, Inter-Fluve, Inc., Haley Aldrich, CES, Inc. and SumCo Eco-Contracting.

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The Penobscot River Restoration Trust is a nonprofit organization responsible for completing the core elements of the Penobscot Project. Members are the Penobscot Indian Nation, American Rivers, Atlantic Salmon Federation, Maine Audubon, Natural Resources Council of Maine, Trout Unlimited, and The Nature Conservancy. Other major partners include the State of Maine (Department of Marine Resources, Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife), Department of the Interior (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs), PPL Corporation, and Black Bear Hydro Partners LLC.      

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About Maine Audubon

Maine Audubon’s science-based approach to conservation, education and advocacy advances wildlife and wildlife habitat conservation in Maine. Our citizen science programs connect Maine people to engaging volunteer opportunities that make meaningful contributions to conservation research. The largest Maine-based wildlife conservation organization, Maine Audubon has eight centers and wildlife sanctuaries and serves over 50,000 people annually, with 15,000 members and 2,000 volunteers.

Conserving Maine’s wildlife.

Please visit www.maineaudubon.org for more information. Facebook: & Twitter ID: Maine Audubon

Action Alert: Help Shape What’s Next for Solar In Maine!

Posted on: Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

Last week, a diverse group of Maine businesses and organizations, including Maine Audubon, petitioned the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC), requesting they not make any changes to net metering. Net metering is the simple, effective mechanism used here in Maine — and most other states — to give solar customers credit on their electricity bills for power they provide to the grid.

Because the Legislature failed to override Governor LePage’s veto of the solar bill, the LePage-appointed PUC is now set to review and consider changes to net metering. To treat solar customers fairly, save ratepayers money, maintain customer choice and protect hundreds of existing jobs, we are urging the PUC not to make changes to net metering rules. Making changes to net metering would disrupt the efforts of groups who want to work together on a solar bill that can pass during the next legislative session.

We need your help! Add your name to a petition to the PUC requesting they not make any changes to net meteringby contacting me at [email protected]
or 207-798-2900.

I also want to personally invite you to one of the upcoming educational forums that Maine Audubon is co-sponsoring called “The Future of Solar in Maine: A Conversation with Maine Leaders about Solar Policy.” For more information and to register, click on the links below.

Join us at an upcoming Future of Solar in Maine forum:

There is a lot of evidence showing that net metering is beneficial for solar customers and other ratepayers alike. Please consider adding your name to the growing list of Maine people, businesses and organizations who are requesting the PUC not make any changes to net metering.

Thank you,
JenniferJenn Burns Gray
Maine Audubon Staff Attorney and Advocate
[email protected]
(207) 781-2330 x224

 

 

To sign up for Maine Audubon’s Action Alert e-mails, please click here.

Celebrating the Start of Summer

Posted on: Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

Kayaking at Scarborough Marsh

It finally feels like summer here at Gilsland Farm and everything is green and blooming.  Buds are just starting to emerge in our formal peony garden, right on schedule so they will hopefully be near peak flower for our Peony Bloom and Ice Cream Social on June 15.

The Peony Bloom and Ice Cream Social is an annual celebration of the organization’s Peony Circle of Friends, dedicated members, donors and volunteers who have supported Maine Audubon with their time, energy and contributions for over twenty years.  This will be my first Peony Social and I’m looking forward to meeting and honoring the special group of supporters who have shown such a deep commitment to stewardship, conservation and environmental education through their long term engagement with Maine Audubon.

Summer means it’s time to get out in the garden so I’m looking forward to learning more about how I can make my backyard wildlife friendly from Dr. Doug Tallamy, author of Bringing Nature Home, when he joins us for our Speaker Series event on June 29.

Summer also means that Gilsland Farm will get an influx of young energy as we’ll daily encounter summer campers on the grounds of the nature reserve, learning about wildlife and enjoying the outdoors under the guidance of our expert educators. There are still a few spots available for budding young naturalists grades K-5 for our day camps at Gilsland Farm and Fields Pond Audubon Center in Holden.

Lastly, summer means that Scarborough Marsh Audubon Center is open! We began opening on weekends Memorial Day weekend and will be open seven days a week starting June 11. Before we opened for the season, I had the pleasure of an afternoon of kayaking on the marsh. It really is a special place. I hope you’ll have a chance to visit Scarborough Marsh or one of the other Maine Audubon centers or sanctuaries this summer.

Hope you are enjoying Maine’s all too brief summer!

-Ole

Ole Amundsen became Executive Director of Maine Audubon in March 2016. He brings more than 25 years of experience in conservation leadership, with a focus on landscape scale conservation, environmental education and finance. Amundsen most recently served as program manager for the national land trust, The Conservation Fund.

Action Alert: Explore What Comes Next for Solar In Maine

Posted on: Monday, June 6th, 2016

Join us for a series of forums around the state that will help answer your questions and explore what comes next for solar in Maine. The series, entitled The Future of Solar in Maine, will bring leading voices on the issue to communities across the state.

Forums are planned for:

  • Waterville: Thursday, June 23
  • Bangor: Tuesday, June 28
  • Rockport: Tuesday, July 12

More details coming soon!

The Legislature’s failure to pass a comprehensive solar bill means Maine does not have a plan to get out of last place regionally on solar. However, the status quo means solar remains a good option for many Mainers.

You’ll also hear more about what’s next at the Public Utilities Commission (PUC), which is set to review and consider changes to net-metering. Net-metering is the simple, effective mechanism existing in Maine—and most other states—to give solar customers credit on their electricity bills for the solar power they provide to the grid when they aren’t using it.

Maine Audubon and partners were deeply engaged in the solar campaign at the Legislature and are committed to defending net-metering at the PUC. I hope you will attend one of the upcoming forums to learn how you can help.

Thank you,
JenniferJenn Burns Gray
Maine Audubon Staff Attorney and Advocate
[email protected]
(207) 781-2330 x224

 

 

To sign up for Maine Audubon’s Action Alert e-mails, please click here.

Brook Trout Pond & Coastal Stream Survey Project Coordinator

Posted on: Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

Sponsors: The position is sponsored by Maine Audubon (MA) and Trout Unlimited (TU), in coordination with the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (MDIFW).

Location: Office space for the position will be provided at Maine Audubon in Falmouth, ME. Travel throughout the state is required, along with dependable transportation and a valid driver’s license.

Responsibilities: The Project Coordinator will recruit volunteers to survey remote ponds and coastal streams for native brook trout, manage multiple independent volunteers during the survey period (April – September), collect and collate report forms, enter data into a database, and summarize findings in a report. Most volunteers will be anglers. We anticipate the following tasks:

  • Coordinate overall goals & specific annual objective with project partners
  • Recruit and assign volunteers to survey Coastal Streams and Remote Ponds
  • Provide support (assistance, direction, training & materials) to volunteers throughout season
  • Prepare and deliver presentations
  • Update and maintain project website
  • Attend events (sporting shows, fishing club meetings, professional conferences, etc) and share information about brook trout conservation, ME Audubon, and the survey project
  • Organize and attend day-long and multi-day group survey trips at remote locations
  • Enter volunteer data into master database for ponds and streams
  • Analyze data to determine which ponds and streams qualify for additional protections
  • Generate annual final reports for partners
  • Assist with other department projects as time and funding allows
  • Other duties as assigned

Desired Qualifications and Skills:

  • Bachelor’s degree in fisheries or wildlife ecology or biology required.
  • Familiarity with angling preferred.
  • Extensive field experience, including backcountry navigation.
  • Experience recruiting, training, and managing volunteers.
  • Familiarity with coast and western/northern Maine landscape.
  • Diplomatic and effective writer, communicator, and public speaker.
  • Excellent interpersonal skills.
  • Ability to work as part of a team.
  • Ability to work independently and make decisions on own, especially in the field.
  • Current driver’s license required.
  • Experience working with computers and excel databases required.
  • Tolerance, patience and good humor helpful.

Physical Requirements: Requires travel throughout the state; working at a computer station for substantial lengths of time; performing office duties such as phoning, filing, and copying, and the ability to lift objects up to 60 pounds.

Work Schedule and Pay rate: Variable daily and weekly schedule; averages 30-40 hours per week starting immediately, through 12/31/16; $14-15/hour, depending on experience.

To Apply: E-mail cover letter and resumé to: [email protected] or mail to Brook Trout Search Committee, Maine Audubon, 20 Gilsland Farm Road, Falmouth, ME 04015. Applications will be reviewed starting June 13; position open until filled.

MEDIA RELEASE: Celebrate the Start of Summer at Maine Audubon’s Peony Bloom and Ice Cream Social

Posted on: Tuesday, May 31st, 2016

MEDIA RELEASE

For Immediate Release

May 31, 2016

Contact: Leslie Taylor, Media Manager
[email protected]
207-781-2330 x276
mobile: 347-225-1510

FALMOUTH – On Wednesday, June 15, Maine Audubon will host their annual Peony Bloom & Ice Cream social, a celebration of the organization’s Peony Circle of Friends, dedicated members, donors and volunteers who have supported Maine Audubon with their time, energy and contributions for over twenty years.

“This is our chance to honor a special group of supporters, who have shown deep commitment to stewardship, conservation and environmental education through their long term engagement with Maine Audubon,” said Executive Director Ole Amundsen, III.

The event, which will be held at Gilsland Farm Audubon Center in Falmouth from 5:00 – 7:00 pm, is free for members, $7 for nonmembers.  Attendees will have the chance to stroll through the formal peony garden while enjoying homemade ice cream donated by Toots Ice Cream and live music from the Sea Slugs. There will also be children’s crafts, face painting and more!

To learn more, please visit http://maineaudubon.org/peonyday2016

The Gilsland Farm peony garden is what remains of the more than four acres of peonies of over 400 varieties once planted by David Edward Moulton (1871-1951), a prominent attorney and founder of the Portland Water District who acquired the property that was to become Gilsland Farm in 1911.

Dozens of peony blooms also grow wild across the property at Gilsland Farm, sprinkling the woods and meadows with blossoms of creamy white, lemon yellow, peppermint-swirl pinks and burgundy reds. Some of the “wild” peonies are older than the trees around them, having survived for more than 50 and 60 years.

“The Peony Bloom and Ice Cream Social is a wonderful opportunity for the Maine Audubon community to come together after a long winter and kick off a summer of enjoying the woods, salt marsh and meadows of our 65-acre sanctuary at Gilsland farm,” said Amundsen.

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About Maine Audubon

Maine Audubon’s science-based approach to conservation, education and advocacy advances wildlife and wildlife habitat conservation in Maine. Our citizen science programs connect Maine people to engaging volunteer opportunities that make meaningful contributions to conservation research. The largest Maine-based wildlife conservation organization, Maine Audubon has eight centers and wildlife sanctuaries and serves over 50,000 people annually, with 15,000 members and 2,000 volunteers.

Conserving Maine’s wildlife.

Please visit www.maineaudubon.org for more information. Facebook: & Twitter ID: Maine Audubon

MEDIA RELEASE: Citizen Scientists Needed to Help Watch for Wildlife on the Road

Posted on: Tuesday, May 24th, 2016

MEDIA RELEASE

For Immediate Release

May 24, 2016

Contact: Leslie Taylor, Media Manager
[email protected]
207-781-2330 x276
mobile: 347-225-1510

Wood turtle. Photo by Tom Hodgman

FALMOUTH – Maine Audubon is looking for volunteers to survey roads in Maine for signs of animal road crossings. Now that the weather has warmed up, many animals are likely to be spotted on or near Maine roads as they move to find food and water, breed or disperse to new areas. Information collected by volunteers about where different animals attempt to cross roads and where collisions are frequent can reduce wildlife road-kill and improve safety for drivers.

Roadside observations can be submitted to Maine Audubon’s Wildlife Road Watch, a web-based map and database designed to record citizen scientists’ observations of road-side and road-killed wildlife. Volunteers should visit maineaudubon.org/wildlife-road-watch to register and start submitting observations.

Information that volunteers contribute to Wildlife Road Watch is used by biologists with Maine Audubon, the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries & Wildlife and the Maine Department of Transportation to help inform policy, management and financial investment decisions that will reduce habitat fragmentation and road risks to wildlife and people.

As habitats change due to a changing climate, wildlife movement becomes an important adaptation strategy and even more crucial to species survival.  Plus, roads can have a big impact on endangered species by impeding movement and separating populations, as well as killing individuals from collisions. Unless changes are made, Maine Audubon biologists report that Blanding’s turtles and spotted turtles are at risk of becoming extinct in Maine due to road mortality.

“The observations contributed by Wildlife Road Watch volunteers provide a critical first step in identifying ways to reduce road-kill and increase safety for people and wildlife,” said Barbara Charry, Conservation Biologist/GIS Manager for Maine Audubon.

Since the inception of the Wildlife Road Watch program in 2010, over 460 volunteers have reported over 4,800 wildlife observations of 130 different wildlife species, including reports of rare and endangered species. To view an interactive map and report of the results of four years of citizen scientist observations visit maineaudubon.or/wildlife-road-watch.

To learn more about Wildlife Road Watch, contact Barbara Charry at Maine Audubon at (207) 781-2330 x225 or [email protected]

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About Maine Audubon

Maine Audubon’s science-based approach to conservation, education and advocacy advances wildlife and wildlife habitat conservation in Maine. Our citizen science programs connect Maine people to engaging volunteer opportunities that make meaningful contributions to conservation research. The largest Maine-based wildlife conservation organization, Maine Audubon has eight centers and wildlife sanctuaries and serves over 50,000 people annually, with 15,000 members and 2,000 volunteers.

Conserving Maine’s wildlife.

Please visit www.maineaudubon.org for more information. Facebook: & Twitter ID: Maine Audubon