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Browsing posts tagged with: brook trout

Volunteer Anglers Needed in Aroostook, Penobscot & Washington Counties

Monday, August 26th, 2013
Posted on:

NEWS RELEASE 

For Immediate Release

August 26, 2013

Contact: Michelle Smith, Communications & Marketing Manager
msmith@maineaudubon.org
(207) 781-6180 x209
Mobile: (207) 838-0511

 Maine Audubon Seeks Anglers for Brook Trout Survey Project this September
Volunteers will help fisheries conservation goals in the state

StatewideMaine Audubon, Trout Unlimited and the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (IFW) are seeking volunteer anglers to survey remote ponds in northern Maine for brook trout this September. Survey information collected by anglers will be used by the nonprofit organizations and IFW to help identify populations of brook trout to be eligible for conservation management practices.

Anglers are needed to survey ponds in:

  • Houlton
  • Ashland
  • Presque Isle
  • Grand Isle
  • Van Buren
  • Lincoln
  • Danforth
  • Mattawamkeag

2013 is the third year of the Brook Trout Pond Survey project. To date this summer, volunteers have surveyed 67 new ponds and have positively confirmed 17 ponds to have brook trout presence. An additional 19 ponds have been identified as having a high likelihood of brook trout presence. With over 300 ponds on the list, Maine Audubon needs the assistance of anglers to survey additional ponds in Aroostook, Penobscot and Washington counties over the course of the next month.

Maine is home to 97% of the intact wild brook trout lake and pond habitat in the eastern United States. Brook trout require clean, cold water and pristine habitat to survive – the population health of brook trout is a key indicator of a healthy ecosystem that also indicates the health of other species, including moose, deer, otters, kingfishers, herons and osprey. The quality and abundance of Maine brook trout has declined in recent years because of the introduction of competing species. Brook trout are important to Maine and the nation’s ecological and sporting heritage and are also a valuable recreational and economic state resource.

Hundreds of remote ponds in the state have never been surveyed by fisheries biologists nor have any record of being stocked with fish. “Identifying the lakes and ponds with native brook trout will greatly assist IFW in planning our conservation management strategies over the next several decades,” noted Merry Gallagher of the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. “The success of this project is entirely dependent on the data collected by volunteer anglers.” The project’s focus on remote lakes and ponds offers anglers a chance to explore new areas of the state. “Volunteers should be enthusiastic about fishing for brook trout, be comfortable in remote settings and have a sense of adventure!” noted Jeff Reardon of Trout Unlimited.

Last year, 66 anglers contributed nearly 1,200 volunteer hours to the Brook Trout Pond Survey project. Thanks to their efforts, 66 ponds from the original list of 372 were surveyed. IFW biologists also conducted official surveys on 33 ponds that volunteers from 2011 identified as brook trout ponds, and confirmed brook trout presence in 26 of these ponds.

Surveys can be completed any time before September 30, 2013. Project partners will provide maps, data sheets and instructions on how to survey each pond. To sign up to volunteer, please contact Emily Bastian at (207) 781-6180 x207 or ebastian@maineaudubon.org.

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About Maine Audubon
A trusted leader for over 100 years, Maine Audubon’s science-based approach to conservation, education and advocacy advances wildlife and wildlife habitat conservation throughout the state of Maine. The largest wildlife conservation organization in the state, Maine Audubon has eight centers and wildlife sanctuaries and serves over 50,000 people annually, with 15,000 members and 2,000 volunteers to

Conserving Maine’s wildlife. For everyone.

Please visit www.maineaudubon.org for more information.
Facebook: & Twitter ID: Maine Audubon

 

Maine Audubon Receives Funding to Restore Aquatic Habitat

A crew surveys a culvert for wildlife accessibility.

A crew surveys a culvert for wildlife accessibility.

NEWS RELEASE 

For Immediate Release

July 11, 2013

Contact: Michelle Smith, Communications & Marketing Manager
msmith@maineaudubon.org
(207) 781-2330 x209
Mobile: (207) 838-0511

 

Maine Audubon Receives Funding to Restore Aquatic Habitat

FalmouthMaine Audubon announced today that it has been awarded a grant from the Elmina B. Sewall Foundation (Freeport) for its work to maintain and restore vital aquatic habitat connections in the state. The $75,000 grant will help support multiple projects related to aquatic conservation, including:

  • Volunteer engagement to complete brook trout pond surveys in northern Maine to determine conservation management practices.
  • Creation of aquatic stewardship best practices through the incorporation of important habitat data into an interactive web-based program that maps ecological and recreational attributes in western Maine
  • Stream-Smart workshops for professionals to repair and build road crossings and culverts that are safe for drivers and maintain habitat connections for wildlife

“Managing for the future sustainability of our water ways is important for the health of our ecosystems in Maine and northern New England,” noted Barbara Charry, wildlife biologist with Maine Audubon. “Numerous rare or iconic species, such as the native brook trout and Atlantic salmon depend on clean, cold waters for survival. Finding safe places to rest, feed and move among rivers, lakes and streams to breed are key for these wildlife.”

To learn more about Maine Audubon’s work to protect aquatic wildlife and wildlife habitat, please visit www.maineaudubon.org.

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About Maine Audubon
Maine Audubon’s science-based approach to conservation, education and advocacy advances wildlife and wildlife habitat conservation in Maine. Our citizen science programs connect Maine people to engaging volunteer opportunities that make meaningful contributions to conservation research. The largest Maine-based wildlife conservation organization in the state, Maine Audubon has eight centers and wildlife sanctuaries and serves over 50,000 people annually, with 15,000 members and 2,000 volunteers.

Conserving Maine’s wildlife. For everyone.

Please visit www.maineaudubon.org for more information.
Facebook: & Twitter ID: Maine Audubon

About Elmina B. Sewall Foundation
The mission of the Elmina B. Sewall Foundation is to support conservation of the natural environment and the well-being of animals and human beings in Maine. Through its giving, the Foundation seeks to make a significant impact, inspire the generosity of others and empower those who share its vision. The Elmina B. Sewall Foundation supports 501(c) 3 organizations working in the Foundation’s areas of interest (animal welfare, environment, and human well-being) within the State of Maine.

 

 

Action Needed: Protect Our Native Brook Trout

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013
Posted on:
fisheyeguyphoto

Maine Audubon Opposes LD 170 – Resolve, To Allow the Use of Live Bait When Ice Fishing in Certain Waters of the State. This bill would impact Maine’s native brook trout by introducing new species that would compete for food sources and put the brook trout population at risk.

Maine is home to 97% of the nation’s wild eastern brook trout lakes and ponds. Brook trout are important to Maine and the nation’s ecological and sporting heritage and are also a valuable recreational and economic state resource.

This population is at risk. The quality and abundance of the fishery has declined for a lot of reasons, but, the biggest threat to the resource is the introduction of competing fish species into the trout’s fragile ecosystem by the use of live bait for fishing.

Facts: In 2012, Maine’s Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife adopted changes to its fishing regulations to ban the use of live fish as bait in nine northern Maine lakes where Brook trout live. We support these changes that are intended to protect important headwaters that feed watersheds containing many of the state’s wild brook trout populations.  LD 170 proposes rules changes which undo these important protections.

The Department’s rules will go into effect April 1, 2013 unless LD 170 passes.  LD 170 directs the Commissioner of the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife to reverse these protective measures.

Senate: (800) 423-6900
House (800) 423-2900
For email contact information, see the House/Senate member list.

Committee Members

Senate:

  • Senator David E. Dutremble (York), Chair
  • Senator Anne M. Haskell (Cumberland)
  • Senator David C. Burns (Washington)

House:

  • Rep. Michael A. Shaw (Standish), Chair
  • Rep. Sheryl J. Briggs (Mexico)
  • Rep. Dale J. Crafts (Lisbon)
  • Rep. Eleanor M. Espling (New Gloucester)
  • Rep. Paul T. Davis, Sr. (Sangerville)
  • Rep. Jeffrey Evangelos (Friendship)
  • Rep. Karen Kusiak (Fairfield)
  • Rep. Timothy I. Marks (Pittston)
  • Rep. Stanley Byron Short, Jr. (Pittsfield)
  • Rep. Stephen J. Wood (Sabattus)

How You Can Help

  1. Attend the public hearing before the Inland Fisheries and Wildlife Committee on March 26, 2013 at 1:00 pm in Room 206 of the Cross Building (next to the State House) and speak up for not allowing live fish as bait in these prime Brook trout waters.
  2. Call or email members of the Inland Fisheries and Wildlife Committee and ask them to oppose LD 170 – Resolve, To Allow the Use of Live Bait When Ice Fishing in Certain Waters of the State.

For more information visit our website where you can learn about all of our Legislative Advocacy priorities or contact jgray@maineaudubon.org

Water-bodies subject to the ban that would be repealed under LD 170 include:

  • Attean Pond, Attean Township (Somerset County)
  • Fish Pond (Little), Hobel Twp. (Somerset Co.)
  • Twin Island Pond, Lowelltown Twp. (Franklin Co.)
  • Mountain Catcher Pond, T06 R08 WELS (Penobscot Co.)
  • Webster Lake, T06 R10 and T06 R11 WELS (Piscataquis Co.)
  • Chase Lake, T09 R10 WELS (Piscataquis Co.)
  • Millimagasset Lake, T7 R8 WELS (Penobscot Co.)
  • Millinocket Lake and Little Millinocket Lake, T07 R9, T8 R9, T7 R10 WELS (Piscataquis Co.)
  • Munsungan Lake (including Little), T08 R9, T8 R10, T9 R10 WELS (Piscataquis Co.)
  • Wheelock Lake, St. John Plt. (Aroostook Co.)
 

Support Proposed Rules to Protect Our Native Brook Trout

Wednesday, October 17th, 2012
Posted on:

Brook trout being measured in the field...Maine’s Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife has proposed changes to its fishing regulations to ban the use of live bait on 16 lakes in northern Maine.

Maine is home to 97% of the intact wild brook trout lake and pond habitat in the eastern U.S.  Brook trout are important to Maine and the nation’s ecological and sporting heritage and are also a valuable recreational and economic state resource.

This population is at risk.  The quality and abundance of the fishery has declined.  The biggest threat to the resource is the introduction of competing fish species into the trout’s fragile ecosystem.

The use of live bait can introduce new fish species to wild brook trout waters that can complete with local brook trout and put the population at risk. The proposed rule changes are intended to protect important headwaters that feed watersheds containing many of the state’s wild brook trout populations.

Please attend one of the hearings and submit comments in support of the proposed changes.
Public Hearing information

  • Monday, Oct. 22 at 6:30 pm, Presque Isle Inn & Convention Center, 116 Main St., Presque Isle
  • Tuesday, Oct. 23 at 6:30 pm, Northern Timber Cruisers Snowmobile Clubhouse, Millinocket Lake Rd., Millinocket
  • Wednesday, Oct. 24 at 6:30 pm, City of Ellsworth, Council Chambers, 1 City Hall Plaza, Ellsworth
  • Thursday, Oct. 25 at 6:30 pm, Brunswick High School, Multi-Purpose Room, 116 Maquoit Rd., Brunswick

Written Comments are due November 15 and should be sent to:
Becky OrffInland Fisheries and Wildlife, 284 State St., 41 State House Station, Augusta, ME 04333-0041
Becky.Orff@maine.gov

Proposed waterbodies that would be subject to the ban

  • First (Billings) Pond, Blue Hill (Hancock Co.)
  • Round Pond and outlet, T10 SD (Hancock Co.)
  • Fish Pond (Little), Hobel Twp. (Somerset Co.)
  • Twin Island Pond, Lowelltown Twp. (Franklin Co.)
  • Mountain Catcher Pond, T06 R08 WELS (Penobscot Co.)
  • Webster Lake, T06 R10 and T06 R11 WELS (Piscataquis Co.)
  • Carr Pond, T13 R08 WELS (Aroostook Co.)
  • Chandler Lake, T9 R8 WELS (Aroostook Co.)
  • Chase Lake, T09 R10 WELS (Piscataquis Co.)
  • Fish River Lake, T13 & 14 R08 WELS (Aroostook Co.)
  • Millimagasset Lake, T7 R8 WELS (Penobscot Co.)
  • Millinocket Lake and Little Millinocket Lake, T07 R9, T8 R9, T7 R10 WELS (Piscataquis Co.)
  • Munsungan Lake (including Little), T08 R9, T8 R10, T9 R10 WELS (Piscataquis Co.)
  • Portland Lake, Bridgewater Twp. (Aroostook Co.)
  • St. Croix Lake, T7 & 8 R4 (Aroostook Co.)
  • Wheelock Lake, St. John Plt. (Aroostook Co.)
 

Brook Trout Pond Survey near Jackman

Tuesday, July 31st, 2012
Posted on:

Maine Audubon’s Sally Stockwell and Amanda Moeser teamed up last week with Maine Dept. of Inland Fisheries & Wildlife fisheries biologists to survey a remote pond near Jackman for wild brook trout. Brook Trout Pond Survey volunteers identified this pond as potential brook trout habitat in 2011 and biologists confirmed the presence of wild brook trout during their visit.

Brook trout are an iconic Maine species and serve as an indicator of healthy landscapes because they require cool, clean water and intact watersheds to survive. In addition to confirming the presence of wild brook trout, the team observed a mother moose and calf, kingfishers, a family of goldeneye ducks, and a diverse population of dragonflies and damselflies in or around the pond. With solid data in hand, we can now work with IF&W and other conservation groups to protect this pond and surrounding habitat. To learn more about the Brook Trout Pond Survey, please visit Trout Unlimited’s website or contact Amanda Moeser at 781-2330 x207 or at amoeser@maineaudubon.org

 

Stream Survey Crews at Work

Tuesday, June 26th, 2012
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Ever wonder what happens to a brook trout when a poorly functioning culvert keeps it from moving up and down stream? Anglers know fish need to move – between spawning, nursery, feeding, and cold water summer refuges – to survive and grow. But about 40% of our culverts are fish barriers and up to 90% keep fish and wildlife from getting where they need to go at least part of the year.

To address this challenge, Maine Audubon has teamed up with The Nature Conservancy and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to survey bridges and culverts in western and northeastern Maine to determine how well fish, wildlife and floods can move through the bridges and culverts at each site. The data will be shared with landowners and towns so they can prioritize which sites to fix first to re-create natural stream flows so fish and other wildlife can move safely up and down stream and so that the culverts, bridges and roads don’t get washed out during heavy rainstorms or floods.